Biographies & Memoirs

4:09:43: Boston 2013 Through the Eyes of the Runners

In the first book on this tragic event, 4:09:43, Hal Higdon, a contributing editor at Runner’s World, tells the tale of the Boston Marathon bombings. The book’s title refers to the numbers on the finish-line clock when the first bomb exploded.

The Spanish on the Northwest Coast: For Glory, God and Gain

They endured the torments of scurvy and the vagaries of deep fogs, adverse winds, and contrary currents. They suffered through appalling quarters and rotting food. They spent years away from their homes and families, never knowing whether they would return. Their orders from Spain might well arrive long after they were needed, six months or longer into the journey. For more than two centuries, Spaniards ranged the coast of the Americas, penetrating almost to the Bering Strait from their bases in Mexico and charting the convoluted coastline of the Pacific Northwest. Yet they persevered, establishing relationships with the native peoples and negotiating disputes with rival explorers from other countries, jubilant in their discoveries, saddened by their losses. And they did it all for the honour of their homeland, the glory of God, and the promise of gain. In the end, Spain would not prevail on the Northwest Coast, but the story of their efforts is one well worth tellingand reading.

24 Hours at Agincourt: 25 October 1415

"Jean de Croy had sworn a remarkable pact with 18 of his fellow knights: they would fight as a body and kill the English king, or die in the attempt. And so they did—launching themselves at the English line. Croy and all 18 of these knights were killed in fierce fighting, but not before they had got close enough to the king to strike repeated blows on his battle helmet, one of them severely damaging the crown that was welded to it—so that two of its rubies were smashed off."  Michael Jones brings the iconic battle vividly to life, drawing on countless authentic eyewitness accounts to showcase both sides of the conflict in a panoramic tour-de-force.

Forgotten Peace: Reform, Violence, and the Making of Contemporary Colombia

Forgotten Peace examines Colombian society’s attempt to move beyond the Western Hemisphere’s worst mid-century conflict and shows how that effort molded notions of belonging and understandings of the past. Robert A. Karl reconstructs encounters between government officials, rural peoples, provincial elites, and urban intellectuals during a crucial conjuncture that saw reformist optimism transform into alienation. In addition to offering a sweeping reinterpretation of Colombian history—including the most detailed account of the origins of the FARC insurgency in any language—Karl provides a Colombian vantage on global processes of democratic transition, development, and memory formation in the 1950s and 1960s. Broad in scope, Forgotten Peace challenges contemporary theories of violence in Latin America.

 

First 3 4 5 6 7 Last